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Keep Your Job When You’re Struggling with Severe Depression

If you suffer from clinical depression when you’re on the job, you know how tough it can be to keep things together on the outside when you feel like you’re falling apart on the inside.

Feeling depressed can also contribute to negative feelings about work, leading to excessive complaining, lack of cooperation, morale problems and absenteeism. Left unchecked, this can threaten your job and livelihood, making you more depressed and promoting a vicious downward spiral.

Fortunately, there are solutions. Many people suffer from the same struggle you’re experiencing, with 1 in 20 workers experiencing depression, affecting at least 10 million people, often between the ages of 25 and 44, according to ValueOptions. The good news is that 80 percent of people suffering with depression can be treated quickly and effectively — but only if you recognize the problem and take appropriate steps. Here are a few strategies you can use to manage severe depression so that you stay productive and don’t lose your job.

Visit an EAP Counselor

Employers know that your mood can affect your productivity, so many companies have an employee assistance program (EAP) in place where you can schedule a visit with an EAP counselor. You can proactively seek EAP counseling by consulting information from your employee handbook or talking to your supervisor or human resources department. Your supervisor may also reach out to you and suggest an EAP counseling appointment if they notice changes in your mood or behavior that make them concerned, although your supervisor can’t diagnose whether you’re clinically depressed.

Schedule a Meeting with a Teletherapist

What if you’re too busy to visit a counselor? One alternative is to schedule an online therapy session at a time that’s convenient for you. Teletherapy allows you to talk to a counselor from a location of your choosing at a time that fits your schedule, which is a viable option for those who simply do not have time or means to make it to a therapist’s physical office. ThriveTalk is a teletherapy service that connects busy people with competent, certified therapists who can provide online therapy via video conference.

Take Mental Health Breaks

Taking a break can be a way to help manage, says U.S. News & World Report patient advice reporter Lisa Esposito. Depending on your condition, simply getting up from your desk periodically to walk to the bathroom may be sufficient, or if you have a major depressive disorder, you may need to take some recuperative time off to avoid a breakdown, get your bearings back or pursue therapy.

Check your employer’s policy to see how much sick time you may be entitled to. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, certain workers are entitled to up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave per year, with a requirement that their group health benefits be maintained during their absence. See the Department of Labor’s website for more details.

Know Your Triggers

Knowing what triggers your depression can help you avoid and respond to situations that are likely to stress you out or that indicate you’re struggling with depression. For instance, you may find yourself engaging in negative self-talk when you’re in a depressed mood. Or you may find yourself spending time crying in the bathroom as a coping mechanism. Keeping track of your triggers can help you stay alert so you can avoid trigger situations or seek help when you find yourself getting overwhelmed.

Get Appropriate Treatment

Sometimes you can’t deal with depression on your own, especially if you have a major depressive disorder. In some cases, therapy alone may be enough to help you. In other cases, you may need medication. Don’t be afraid of trying therapy or medication due to stigmas associated with it. If it helps you restore your peace of mind and keep your job, it’s worth it.

Use these proactive strategies to keep your mood manageable so that you can stay productive while battling depression. Visit ThriveTalk.com or call (619) 630 7045 to get the help you need today.

If you feel that depression is negatively impacting your life, please reach out for help today. Contact NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) to help get you connected with the right support services in your area by calling 1-800-950-6264. If you or someone you know is in crisis, whether you are considering suicide or not, please call the toll-free Lifeline at 800-273-8255 to speak with a trained crisis counselor 24/7.

5 Ways That You Can Fight Depression

According to the World Health Organisation, 350 million people worldwide suffer from depression. If you’re one of those people, you shouldn’t feel any shame.  You should get the help you need and take action to start feeling better.  Here are 5 methods for fighting depression that might help!


Talk To A Therapist

First of all, talk to a licensed mental health professional.  You may feel nervous about seeing a therapist for the first time.  You may not be sure where to find one.  It is now easier than ever to find and see a therapist, with the help of sites like Thrivetalk.com.  A lot of us may feel uncertain if therapy can help, but guess what? That self-doubt is your depression talking. The way that you feel isn’t something that you can battle alone.  Self-medication, like alcohol, drugs, or overworking, won’t help.

Like a broken arm, depression is a health condition that you must get treated.  You deserve the help you need to live a happier, more fulfilled life.  If you had arthritis or were suffering from chronic headaches, you’d talk to your doctor, Your depression is no different. You deserve to feel better.  In some cases, your doctor might recommend anti-depressant medications.  The most common drugs prescribed for depression are SSRIs: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.  Medication may help, but with your depression, but be aware that you might feel worse before you feel better again. Even with medication, it is essential that you undertake a comprehensive treatment plan that includes therapy.  Go to a therapist – talking to someone can really help you figure out what to do with the way that you’re feeling and work out how to express it in non-destructive ways.


Start Exercising

Exercise is something that can really help people with depression. There might be days when you’re full of energy and other days when you simply can’t get off the couch, and you should listen to your body to some extent. But the vast majority of the time, putting on your running shoes and going for a jog around the block will make you feel better. Not only will it release endorphins, otherwise known as happy hormones, that will flood through your body, but it will also make you feel as though you’ve accomplished something. Yoga has been proven to help with depression, so check out online videos or go along to local classes where you might even meet like-minded people that you can socialize with. Feeling better in your body will help you feel better in your mind too.

Find A New Hobby

Everyone has different ways of tackling their mental illness. However, one thing that strikes many people with depression is that they tend to get mired in their thoughts.  This can be like quicksand for your mind and keep you from taking action on anything. That means that it could be time to develop a new hobby. That might be getting really, really immersed in a new TV show, learning to knit or sew, making your own costumes so that you can cosplay at conventions, making your own elderflower wine, painting watercolor landscapes, or baking incredible cakes. The list goes on, but the point is that diverting your attention to something else, something that’s productive and keeps your mind busy, will absolutely help you when you’re starting to feel low.


Recognize Your Self Destructive Thoughts

When you have depression, your mind will be incredibly sneaky and start telling you things that simply aren’t true.  Some typical narratives include: you aren’t attractive, that you shouldn’t be alive, that you’re useless, that you’re bad at your job, or that your friends don’t like you. It’s important to recognize these thoughts for what they are, which is your sneaky depression telling you lies and making you feel bad about yourself. It can be difficult to break away from your self-destructive thoughts, but it’s important to make sure that you don’t make any decisions based on them.  It’s typically not a great idea to quit a job where you generally do just fine, or missing out on seeing friends who love and care about you. Use concrete examples like messages from friends or results you’ve seen at work or the fact your parents love you to combat your self-destructive thoughts and remind yourself that you are worthwhile, loved, and worthy of happiness.


Practice Self Care

Finally, when you’re suffering from depression it’s important to remember that you must take care of yourself. However, that doesn’t mean giving in to every whim, canceling plans, and eating comfort food. Caring for yourself starts with the basics, like getting out of bed, showering, wearing clean clothes, and getting some fresh air. Contact your friends, exercise, and eat fresh food instead of ordering pizza. Remember that you don’t have to cook much to be healthy.  Carrot sticks and hummus are a great and easy snack.  Simple lunches like egg salad sandwiches on whole wheat bread and a banana are both easy and healthy.  No matter what you like to eat, ensure you get enough protein, vitamins, fats, and carbohydrates. Listen to your body – get plenty of sleep, drink lots of water, keep yourself clean, and exercise frequently.


Depression can negatively impact your life, but you should ensure that it doesn’t take your life away from you. Listening to yourself and taking care of yourself are some of the most important things you can do.  Getting help from a licensed mental health professional is the best way to combat chronic depression.



5 Vitamin & Mineral Deficiencies That Cause Depression

Vitamins and minerals are essential for the body and mind to function correctly, but many people have low levels of these crucial nutrients in the body. Vitamin and mineral deficiencies can cause a wide range of physical problems, but they can also affect mental health and may even be the cause of depression, anxiety and low mood in some people. Here are five vitamin and mineral deficiencies that could be causing your distress.

Vitamin D

vitamin d

Studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to depression and some chronic diseases, including high blood pressure, diabetes and autoimmune disease. Vitamin D is needed for the body to absorb calcium, but many people are not getting enough. Modern lifestyles are thought to be at least partly responsible for low levels of vitamin D, which is produced in the body when skin is exposed to sunlight. Working long hours in offices with artificial lighting, sedentary lifestyles, and even excessive use of sunscreen are all thought to contribute to vitamin D deficiency. Supplements may be the only solution for people, as it’s difficult to obtain vitamin D from food.


B Vitamins


Low levels of B vitamins are known to cause depression, irritability, and fatigue. In particular, vitamins B6, B12, and folate have been linked to a wide range of mental and physical health problems. Increasing intake of foods containing these essential nutrients can bring significant improvements for some people. Vitamin B6 is found in chicken, leafy green vegetables, bananas and some kinds of seafood, while people usually can get their B12 from animal products such as poultry, meat, and dairy products. Liver, citrus fruits, legumes, dark green leafy vegetables, and yeast extract contain folate. Vegetarians, vegans, and people on restrictive diets may need to take a vitamin B complex supplement.


fight depressionIron deficiency can cause a range of symptoms similar to those of depression, including mental and physical fatigue, low mood and irritability. Deficiency is more common in women than in men.  Up to half of all pregnant women thought to have low levels of iron. Liver, red meat, poultry, and fish are the best sources of iron. However, pregnant women should avoid liver, as it contains high amounts of vitamin A, which can be harmful to unborn children. Vegetarian sources of iron include beans, pulses, and fortified cereals.



fight off depression with seleniumSelenium is a mineral with potent antioxidant properties. It is essential for mental health, a healthy metabolism and healthy thyroid function. Insufficient levels of selenium might contribute to depression, persistent low mood, and negative thoughts. Brazil nuts are the best source of selenium, but it also is in walnuts, chicken, beef, fish, and whole grains. Supplements are available, but they can interact with some prescription medications, including birth control pills, corticosteroids, and medicines used to reduce cholesterol levels, so it’s important to talk to your doctor before taking selenium supplements.


fight depressionMagnesium is often known as the relaxation mineral, as it has a powerful impact on mood and the nervous system. It is necessary for the proper functioning of almost every process in the body. However, up to half of all adults are thought to be deficient in this essential mineral, the shortage of which can lead to depression, anxiety, migraine, high blood pressure and several chronic health conditions. Spinach, dark chocolate, oily fish, bananas, and almonds are all rich in magnesium. Supplements are safe for most people, but high doses (above 500 mg) can interact with some medications.

Avoiding Depression

Vitamin and mineral deficiencies, sometimes associated with depression, anxiety, and mood disorders, also can lead to many chronic health conditions. Vitamin D, B vitamins, iron, selenium, and magnesium are all needed for mental health. While most people can get enough of these nutrients through diet or supplements, serious deficiencies may require medical treatment.

vitamins fight depression